Healthcare technology, like all professional environments, is at its strongest when powered by diversity, equality, and creative thinking. In an industry as widespread as healthcare, it’s crucial that companies invite talent that is just as varied as the markets they serve. These five leading women in healthcare IT roles are examples of diversity and ingenuity in action.

“Having women in top leadership positions is so important in healthcare because our patients are incredibly diverse. Women bring a unique perspective, but their influence can be impeded unless they are in leadership roles.”

 – Cathie Brown, VP and Chief Information Security Officer, Impact Makers

Judy Faulkner

CEO, Epic Systems

Founded in 1979, Epic designs software to “help people get well, help people stay well, and help future generations be healthier.” Judy Faulkner began the company in a basement in Verona, Wisconsin with her passion for math, computer science, and medicine. By joining these interests, she created this tech company specializing in electronic medical records.

Epic Systems is now responsible for storing more than half of the United States population’s medical information. By partnering with key providers like Kaiser Permanente, Epic continues to deliver accessible and understandable health records to physicians and patients.

In 2018, Judy earned herself the achievement of being the #3 richest self-made woman in the U.S. as a result of her endless pursuit for advancing healthcare technology.

Sandra Johnson

Vice President of Revenue Cycle Management, Johns Hopkins Medicine

In her role, Johnson holds revenue cycle responsibility for five of the hospitals within Johns Hopkins Medicine and helps manage close to $4.5 billion every year. Last year, Johnson was instrumental in the development and implementation of an Epic double upgrade, which helped improve efficiency in care with minimized disruptions. Additionally, she has overseen the creation of a shared services center for health information management and the implementation of an electronic medical records system.

Through the course of her responsibilities, Johnson has improved patient access services, health information management, managed care, and patient financial services.

Julia Cheek

Women in Health IT Giving a PresentationCo-Founder & CEO, EverlyWell

Inspired to build a better solution to a common patient issue, Julia created Everlywell to offer better and more affordable access to lab testing for diagnosis or treatment. Despite not coming from a background in the health space, Julia recognized the need for clinically-relevant and understandable information for patients to act on.

 

“I never got the [lab] results and nothing was ever explained to me. But because I was on a high deductible plan, months later I ended up getting bills from the labs for hundreds and thousands of dollars.”

EverlyWell answers this demand with regulatory-compliant, physician-mediated at-home lab tests. These tests include thyroid, metabolism, sexual health, breast milk DHA testing, and a multitude of others. After choosing your test of interest, EverlyWell mails your individual at-home kit and provides personalized results on their secure and confidential website in an easy-to-understand format. As consumer preferences lean more towards convenience and simplicity, EverlyWell speaks to the trends healthcare is noticing, acts as an example of telehealth, and delivers a more personal approach to improving health outcomes.

Amy Sheng

Co-Founder, CellScope Inc.

While working as a project manager for UC Berkeley developing smartphone microscopes for emerging markets in 2011, Amy collaborated with Erik Douglas to co-found CellScope Inc. They designed their company to introduce digital first aid kits to homes across the country. As part of the company’s first project, they designed CellScope Oto, an otoscope built for smartphones that can capture diagnostic-quality ear images to diagnose ear infections. With over 20 million doctor’s visits per year for ear infections alone, Amy recognized the utility in this product.

“We’re [CellScope] positioned at the exciting intersection of mobile, medical device-enabled services and data. CellScope is building products and services for families to get quick relief and peace of mind.”

CellScope leverages the power and ubiquity of cellphones to elevate healthcare and its delivery for consumers. In doing so, it enables people to take an active role in managing personal and family health.

Read moreHow Wearable Devices are Revolutionizing the Doctor-Patient Relationship

Halle Tecco

Co-Founder & Managing Director, Rock Health

While studying at Harvard Business School, Halle joined forces with Dr. Nate Gross in 2010 to create Rock Health, a capital firm helpful in funding innovative health-tech startups. Included in this list of startups is Stride Health and Doctor on Demand. Rock Health offers capital and professional mentorship for new companies and has attracted support from Microsoft, Qualcomm, Quest Diagnostics, and Genentech.

Halle represents one of the unique characteristics of the health technology field: diversity. Her background in business inspires those who may not have a strong background in health but are still passionate about getting involved in the growing field. Similarly, Rock Health invites developers and programmers—who may not have a background in health either—to produce new, inventive thinking about health care delivery.

Promoting Women in Healthcare IT

Join the conversation and tell us about any women in healthcare who have inspired you! Follow us on Twitter at @UNE_HealthIT and use #WomeninHIT to share your story.

Or do you want to become the next change-maker in health technology? If so, you can start making your mark on healthcare IT by earning a Master or Graduate Certificate in Health Informatics. Download our program brochure to learn more: